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Madness Unleashed Journal #2 – Confidence

March 26, 2015 Leave a comment

Why is it that so many lower seeded teams in the NCAA March Madness bracket upset the favored team?58842030-Dan+Weedin+%22Unleashed%22-30

These are all factors…

3. Lower seeded teams tend to be more “mature.” They have juniors and seniors, whereas many of the “better” teams are younger due to the “one and done” players. This ultimately means better decision-making.

2. In basketball, often you just need one really good player to carry you. Many teams can ride the shoulders of the “hot” player and overcome more talented teams.

And the most important in my mind…

1. Confidence. When teams that aren’t “supposed” to win get to hang around for the entire game, they get to a point where they believe they can and will win.

Confidence for leaders helps you win your own “championship games.” Confidence allows you to say both YES and NO when each are appropriate (and you will know the difference). Confidence allows you to ask tough questions, make bold moves, take risks, and meet people you might ordinarily be fearful of reaching out to.

Confidence wins in March Madness. It wins in leadership, too. It allows you to be “unleashed.”

© 2015 Dan Weedin. All rights reserved

Within Decay…Rebirth

March 20, 2015 Leave a comment

58842030-Dan+Weedin+%22Unleashed%22-30I’m thrilled and honored to be today’s guest columnist on Alan Weiss’s blog, Alan’s Blog. The blog is geared to consultants, speakers, authors, and entrepreneurs. Today’s blog article is about how in your own business and career (just like in nature) that within decay, there is rebirth.

Please read and share your comments here on my blog…or on his!

Read Article on Alan’s Blog

© 2015 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

Branding Iron Hot

March 12, 2015 5 comments

TWoodsTiger Woods has not been the best golfer in the world for about half a decade now. For a period of about 8 to 9 years, Woods was the game of golf. He owned it. He was being hailed as the greatest ever, and for the period of time he ruled the sport, he probably was. When you consider the global talent that has come on the scene, it’s arguable that he did what nobody else ever did in golf, and perhaps all of sports.

However over the past 5 years, age, injury, and scandal have taken their toll on Tiger. Not only isn’t he a factor in the game right now, he literally can’t seem to make it through a tournament because of injury or poor play. Yet in spite of all of that, his brand is still strong. So strong, that he doesn’t even own his own name.

Woods is building a restaurant in Florida near his home of Jupiter. The restaurant will be called The Woods Jupiter: Sports and Dining Club because apparently Nike owns the rights to the words “Tiger Woods” as relates to business property. Don’t feel bad for Tiger; he did it to himself and probably pocketed a gazillion dollars from it. This isn’t the point of my article; so let’s get to it.

Athletes like Tiger Woods and Michael Jordan have become so powerful within their own name, that they’ve become a brand themselves. Arnold Palmer (at 84 years old) made more from endorsements in 2013 – $40,000,000 – than the great soccer stars Renaldo and Messi. That’s brand!

I have two questions for you – what’s your personal brand worth and is built to be sustainable?

How do you build your own personal brand if you’re an individual? You create an intellectual property empire with words (books, articles, blogs, etc) and voice (speaking). You deliver such incredible value that your name will soon precede you. You build “armies” like Arnie did by being charismatic, engaging, and the ultimate object of interest. You continually evolve, invent, create, and grow.

How does your company or organization build a brand? The same way, except that it is manifested through your employees and by your leadership. You create a culture of “playing for each other;” you encourage ideas; you build leaders within your organization; you collaborate; and you never stop growing and developing yourself.

Here’s the deal. Regardless of whether you are a brand of 1 person or a million employees, “branding” has become the most important business strategy you must focus on. It projects your reputation and your value to others; and it is what will protect you from any economic crisis or the winds of change. Tiger Woods has kept his brand strong even has is golf game withers. Michael Jordan hasn’t suited up for an NBA basketball game in nearly two decades, yet sales of his shoes are monstrous. The majority of golf fans in the world never saw Arnold Palmer play; yet his brand is still legendary. What about you? What do you need to accomplish to be branding iron hot with yours?

© 2015 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

Core Strength

March 5, 2015 2 comments

I’ve started changing how I work out. The reason is quite simple…my core strength stinks.Dan Weedin Unleashed-19

You see, I’ve been working out since being a high school athlete. For the most part, I’ve focused on the “fun” exercises; the ones that show the quickest results and you get to most enjoyment performing. For me, that was upper body work and strength. When you’re young, it’s easier to get away with that because a lot of other things I used to do (e.g. play competitive basketball) kept me in overall good shape. As I’ve begun to “mature,” some of those fun things have either drastically changed or stopped entirely. The regrettable result is that my core strength is exposed because it has been neglected. To that end, I am now humbling myself to learn new “tricks” to do the work that I’ve never found fun…abs and legs. I am writing this today since this morning I was focused on those two areas. We will see how agile I am later this afternoon…

For your business to stay agile and resilient as it matures, you’d better have a good core strength. In your case, that’s a strategic plan to deal with anything that can hurt you. Allow me to explain…

I’ve watched people age well into their 80s and 90s. Not just my parents, but the people around them. I’ve observed how poor balance, decreased strength, and loss of perception wreaks havoc on their bodies and their ability to function. By being intentional and strategic about my exercise regimen, I’m giving myself the best chance of avoiding or at least mitigating that peril when I get to that age.

Your business will face crisis. In fact, it’s most likely that you will face many crises over the years, all different in size and scope. Those executives and business owners that don’t build up their core strength – their planning, preparation, and practice – are in a clear and present danger situation. In the event of a serious crisis, they are as likely as a 93 year old to lose their balance, stumble, fall, and not be able to get up. For both, the consequences can be catastrophic.

So here’s what you do…

Take a cue from my revised exercise plan. Create your own plan on building up your core by creating a comprehensive strategic crisis and disaster recovery plan; include a communications plan to apprise your employees, customers, supply chain, etc.; implement and practice regularly; get help from experts to assure you’re not breathing your own exhaust; and repeat annually. This way, you’re giving yourself the best chance to avoid the calamity of not being able to survive a “fall.”

Your health can’t be delegated to someone else. Crisis leadership can’t be delegated, either. If you’re the boss, it’s your job to strategize. You can delegate tasks, but not the global planning and strategy. And just like brushing off regular workouts, this is the biggest mistakes business leaders make in their company. It’s time to get real and get serious to protect your business and all those that count on you. And it only starts with a few situps…

© 2015 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

© 2015 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

Weedin Unleashed Recording – Leave a Mark

March 3, 2015 Leave a comment

Recording from yesterday…

18 minutes, 28 seconds

P.S. I will be announcing 10 year anniversary specials on programs, workshops, and resources on March 15th. Stay tuned!

© 2015 Dan Weedin. All rights reserved

To Tell the Truth

February 25, 2015 2 comments

“My name is Bob McDonald and I was in Army Special Forces.”Dan Weedin Unleashed-40

“My name is Bob McDonald and I was in Army Special Forces.”

“My name is Bob McDonald and I was in Army Special Forces.”

Will the real Bob McDonald stand up?

If you watched the old game show, To Tell the Truth, you will recognize this exchange. Three people all claiming to be the same person, yet 2 are fibbing. Of course, they are fibbing on purpose to fool the contestant. Seems like newly minted Veteran Affairs boss Bob McDonald is taking a cue from NBC News anchor Brian Williams and playing the fool.

I watched the news last night and watched with my own eyes the video of Mr. McDonald having a dialogue with a veteran who had fallen on hard times. He asked what service the man had been in and the response was, “Army…Special Forces.” The head of the federal administration that is tasked with helping this American hero in bad times then glibly replies, “Yeah…I was Army Special Forces!, too” Trouble for McDonald is he wasn’t. Yes, he was in the army. No he wasn’t in Special Forces. Oops.

McDonald quickly apologized after he was called out by a veterans group that did a little fact checking. A contrite McDonald said he made a mistake “in an effort to connect” with this man. The term “misstatement” has now been used again in just a matter of weeks. It’s becoming as popular to use as Marshawn Lynch saying, “I’m only here so I won’t get fined.” At least Marshawn is telling the truth!

Here’s how to connect. Be humble. You can say, “Wow, I was army too, but not special forces. What an honor to meet you!”

McDonald is no newbie to leadership positions. You don’t get to be hired for this role by the President of the United States if you have no background in leadership. Which leads me to believe that “misstatements” may also be idly tossed about on a daily basis around board rooms and offices around the world. In business, it’s harder to get caught and easier to get away with.

Here’s the deal…

If you desire to be influential; to be a leader; and to be significant (see my previous article on this matter), then your misstatements need to be actual mistakes, not a fancy word for lying. The quickest way to lose credibility to your team (employees, co-workers, clients, boss, community) is to stand up and lie. Let’s be clear, a lot of misstatements being made are probably considered “little white lies;” you know those things that won’t actually hurt anyone.

Do yourself a favor. If you’re reading this, there’s a pretty good chance you are in some leadership or management position. Even if it’s being influential in your family with your kids, you at some point are being looked at to guide. The best way you can gain trust and lead effectively over time is to avoid “misstatements” like the ones Mr. Williams and Mr. McDonald have recently made. Instead, learn how to improve your language skills so you can honestly, genuinely, and with empathy tell the truth.

© 2015 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

Weedin Unleashed Video – Success and Significance

February 24, 2015 Leave a comment

19 minutes

© 2015 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

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