Extra Points: Veterans Day Special

Dad_DonWeedinFirst published on Veterans Day 2016…

It was February 11, 1942. Just lightly over two months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Don Weedin – who celebrated his 17th birthday just the day before – dropped out of school at Bremerton High School.

That morning, he boarded a ferry with his parents and enlisted in the United States Navy. He needed his parents permission because he was under 18 years old. He wanted to go on his birthday as he was eager to enlist; she made him stay and celebrate his birthday with his family. His older brother Max Jr. was already in the war. Grandma feared that neither would come back to her.

Dad served in World War II and for a total of 30 years. He loved the Navy and would have stayed forever if he was allowed to. Growing up as a youngster in the 1970s, the attitude towards veterans and those serving was very different. It was post-Vietnam and at least in my memory, being in the service didn’t have the same level of gratitude. I never could understand why Dad didn’t have a diploma, but rather something called a GED. It wasn’t until I became an adult that the immense nature of his sacrifice began to sink in. Fortunately for me, Dad lived a long life and I was able to express to him my sincere gratitude for his service. He was part of “The Greatest Generation” that Tom Brokaw wrote about. Where once I was ambivalent as a child, today I’m proud.

We all have stories like this to share. My family has deep ties to the armed forces – my father-in-law and sister-in-law were Navy; my brother was Army; my brother-in-law and sister-in-law were Coast Guard; and I have a nephew currently serving in the Air Force. Dad was able to trace our family lineage back to three direct descendant grandfathers that served in the Revolutionary War.

Veterans Day is unique because it’s a day to honor all veterans. Dad was always strong in his belief that Memorial Day was to honor those that gave the ultimate sacrifice of their lives. Veterans Day is clearly a day to celebrate everyone that ever served.

So for those family members that served or serve – thank you.

To my friends from high school and college that served or serve – thank you.

To those that I will never meet but know that because of you, I get to live in a free country and be able to raise a family and run my own business – thank you.

God Bless America and all veterans….

P.S. My most special thanks to Don Weedin, my dad, who finally got to graduate with his granddaughter Mindy and get the diploma he so richly deserved in 2007 (see below)

high school grad

Quote of the Day:

“True heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic. It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost, but the urge to serve others at whatever the cost.”

~ Arthur Ashe

© 2018 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The key to personal and professional improvement is accountability. My mentoring and coaching program has availability. Contact me at dan@danweedin.com or (360) 271-1592 to apply.

Extra Points: Simple & Speed is King

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40Last week I ordered a salad and smoothie from the local drive-thru cafe and salad shop. I paid online for custom-order lunches. They sent me an immediate email acknowledging my order and letting me know that another email would soon arrive as to when my order would be ready. That came about one minute later and gave me a “ready time” that was seven minutes away. That was enough time to jump in my car, drive about half a mile, and pick up my meals. I was back home in three minutes.

It’s time to vote this week. In my state, I already voted. We are an all-mail in state voting system; in other words – no standing in lines, no driving to polling places, no traffic, no issues with picking up kids, no forgetting, no excuses. More importantly, it’s easy and fast.

On the other hand, three organizations I care about and am actively involved in all make me write a check for annual or monthly dues. In every case (unless they are keeping it a best kept secret – but then again I asked), each organization has no method for paying with a credit card online.

I see this same malady among many small businesses who are trying hard to compete with larger brethren. They don’t accept credit cards or have minimums; they make people stand in long lines; they give broad time frames for service; and they offer little to no real-time communications.

The problem is they are placing the burden on the customer or client. In a world where simplicity and convenience is king; and where speed to market or to pay is everything (see Amazon payment to home in two days or less); the adamant attitude of making the client guess, wait, or work harder is the quickest way to organizational demise. Small business actually has the advantage of nimbleness and speed, yet time after time I see many remain in the mode of dictating to customers and clients. If a small business selling salads and smoothies can do it, so can you.

If you aren’t concerned about being relevant, then continue to be hard to do business with. If you want to take advantage of your nimbleness and personal touch, use inexpensive and easy to access tools and resources to make your clients happy to do business with you.

Quote of the Day:

“The only courage that matters is the kind that gets you from one moment to the next.”

~ Mignon McLaughlin

© 2018 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Extra Points: Scared of Change?

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40My earliest memory of Halloween is dressing up as Captain America as a young boy and trick or treating with my parents. For a long period of time, that was how Halloween was celebrated.

As I grew older as a teenager, the celebration style changed. Trick or treating ended and hanging out with friends became the norm. As young adults, Halloween became about parties and costumes came back, although often with more creativity. The trend in change continued through having children that went through the same process. For me, Halloween is still fun for adult parties and watching my granddaughter start her own process.

So where am I going with this?

Businesses and careers have cycles of change as they mature and grow. In order to stay relevant and cutting edge, it’s important to be innovative and open to change. Halloween can’t stay the same through our own maturation process or else we look foolish. Likewise, if our businesses and careers never evolve, the danger of obsolescence and looking foolish is just as real.

Final thought: As I watched my children and now my granddaughter moving through their own, I am committed to letting them enjoy their time doing it their way. In business, companies should be mentoring and coaching, while allowing for autonomy, failures, and individuality.

Change is necessary for growth, maturation, and rebirth of companies and careers. That way you can assure both tricks and treats in your business and career.

Quote of the Week:

Research is creating new knowledge.

~ Neil Armstrong

The key to personal and professional improvement is accountability. My mentoring and coaching program has availability. Contact me at dan@danweedin.com or (360) 271-1592 to apply.

Extra Points: On Demand Economy

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40Barb and I enjoy binge watching television shows. Companies like Netflix and Hulu (as well as networks that create subscriber access to all their shows and then some) have created an “on demand” lifestyle of entertainment. The only live television I watch is sports, especially because it’s nearly impossible to keep scores and results a secret with social media and pop-up notifications. We have full control of what we watch, when we watch, and for how long we watch.

The same is true with activities like getting transportation (Uber and Lyft); finding restaurant reviews (Yelp and Trip Adviser); and finding someone to deliver food from your favorite restaurant (Uber Eats and Amazon). Technology has provided the opportunity to live “on demand.”

Because of this phenomenon, an On Demand Economy is growing and beginning to create a business model for aspiring entrepreneurs.

It’s not unusual for employees to have a “side hustle,” where they create or buy into a product or service where they gain revenue outside of their work. Multi-Level marketing companies have fostered this for years, and now opportunities created by Lyft, Uber Eats, and other on demand businesses make it easy for people to work when they want, for as long as they want. These entrepreneurs have created an “on demand” business to cater those that want services “on demand!”

Take a look at your business. What “on demand” options do you offer? If banks can offer on demand check deposits, then you can find a way to create offer on demand services to your clients. The reality is that today it seems like a cool thing to have. In five years, you’ll be obsolete if you don’t offer it.

Final thought: I believe all people living in 1st World economies like ours have an opportunity to create their own income outside of a job. It’s never been easier than before to innovate and offer your unique talents in an on demand economy (as long as you’re not contractually restricted from it). The On Demand Economy is on the rise and will be a wave that carries new entrepreneurs and ingenious companies. Will you be one of them?

Quote of the Week:

“Nine-tenths of wisdom is being wise in time.”

~ Theodore Roosevelt

The key to personal and professional improvement is accountability. My mentoring and coaching program has availability. Contact me at dan@danweedin.com or (360) 271-1592 to apply.

Extra Points: Warning Signals

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40This past weekend, we rented a van to help our daughter get furniture for her new place. I used the application system to check out the van and get the key before the place opened up. To my surprise, upon starting up the van, a warning light came on indicating the the right rear tire was low and needed air.

Great.

I knew my local Les Schwab tire dealership was open and took it over to have the professionals look at it. The service they provided was immediate and quick (and that’s why I remain a loyal client). Turned out that the monitor wasn’t working and the tires were all good to go. The annoying thing is that the warning light stayed on the entire day. While I had plenty of piece of mind about it thanks to the help of my friendly tire guy, I had to mentally work hard to ignore the ongoing false warning.

As we work and live day to day, warning signs pop up all the time. You might notice that an employee is acting unusual right before they give their notice; you might get a scratchy throat before the nasty cold hits; or you might get a nervous feeling in the pit of your stomach before embarking on a bold move or difficult conversation.

Here’s the deal – warning signs are there to protect and warn us. Often, the best thing to do is to seek out some council from a professional (like my tire guy) in order to gain wisdom or just peace of mind. Warning signs can hang around well after the initial indication and often these are self-inflicted. The aggravation I felt about looking at the dash indicator was on me and threatened to negatively impact my mood for the remainder of the trip.

Warning signs are good to heed and educate yourself about, yet they should never be an obstacle. Identify the warning signs when they come up and then make a decision (often with that wise council from a trusted partner) on how to proceed; then commit and confidently move forward without worrying about past lights flashing in your face.

Quote of the Week:

The greatest teacher, failure is.

~ Yoda to Luke Skywalker in The Last Jedi (guess what we watched this weekend?)

The key to personal and professional improvement is accountability. My mentoring and coaching program has availability. Contact me at dan@danweedin.com or (360) 271-1592 to apply.

Extra Points: The No Brainer

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40Last week, I was at LinkedIn Learning to film my second course. They generously take care of all my travel, including rental car. While standing in line at Avis, we were informed they were out of cars and that we had to wait until some came in. After about 15 minutes, my turn came because the gentleman in front of me required a full-size vehicle and I told them I’d take whatever came in. The lady at the desk – obviously dealing with what would was becoming a long day for her – said she had two cars available for me and then stoically asked if I preferred a Kia or a Mustang.

With all due respect to Kia, this was a no brainer. I’m in Southern California and I wanted all the fun that a sports car with power brings. The Mustang became mine for a few days and I loved it.

“No brainers” would seem to be more rare in business, right? Let’s face it, all decisions have upsides and downsides. That being said, I suggest we make some “no brainers” more complicated due to over-thinking. Over-thinking is born out of lack of trust and confidence. It might be lack of trust in employees; in vendors; in clients; and most commonly in one’s own self. It’s the equivalent of me wondering if I should eschew the fun and frivolity of an alluring sports car for the fuel economy of a sensible sedan.

We can all be guilty of over-thinking decisions both professional and personal. The consequences of over-thinking include losing valuable time; increasing stress and anxiety; and making the wrong decision based out of plain fear.

Smart business leaders assess situations and cost-benefit quickly, make confident decisions based on experience and perception; and then commit fully.

Here’s the deal…while you won’t always be right, you’ll be fast and bold. And sometimes, a risky decision will actually end up being a huge win. Just because it seems like an easy answer doesn’t mean you have to make it more complicated. In the realm of decision-making, pick the sports car more often than not. It’s the quickest way to being unleashed.

Quote of the Week:

When you rise in the morning, give thanks for the light, for your life, for your strength. Give thanks for your food and for the joy of living. If you see no reason to give thanks, the fault lies in yourself.

~ Tecumseh

The key to personal and professional improvement is accountability. My mentoring and coaching program has availability. Contact me at dan@danweedin.com or (360) 271-1592 to apply.

Extra Points: Brainwashed

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40You’re being brainwashed.

A recent article and shared video by my Shrimp Tank podcast co-host, Brad Berger really caught my attention and compelled me to write on this topic. Many thanks to Brad.

We as humans are greatly influenced by advertising, cultural concepts, and the media (including to a large degree, social media). Even though we may declare to the contrary, we tend to believe most of what we hear and read. Without any demand for proof, we succumb to the peril of being brainwashed into thinking that can harm our health, make us scared, spend our money recklessly, and cause anxiety and stress.

Consider these examples: Food advertising that glowingly espouses low or fat free options when fat isn’t the enemy of poor health. The sugar that is used to saturate the products is. Media that tell us that we are more unsafe than ever when the statistics are clear that we are safer than at any other time in human history. Our society telling us that we should be winding down into retirement at age 65 when research shows that we can be at our peak until well into our 80s. Don’t even get me started on the pharmaceutical attack that encourages us to take all sorts of legal drugs while at the end rapidly telling us the horrible potential side-effects! Here’s the deal my friends. If you want to live an unleashed life, then eschew the “brainwashers.”

The reality of what is possible in your life is up to you. This includes your professional career and business. I encourage you to watch this video. I hope you find it as inspirational as I did. While I feel like I knew this information before and worked hard to avoid the brainwashing, this is a great reminder about how ubiquitous it is in our life.

Here’s my attempt to “brainwash” you: To live the life you want you must eat well; exercise your mind and body; get plenty of sleep; visit your doctor on a proactive not reactive basis; read more; explore more; smile more; don’t trust everything you read in social media or see on commercials; cultivate human relationships; and enjoy the ride.

Now Captain Jack and Bella might say you should also get a dog, but I will leave that as optional.

Quote of the Week:

“A champion is someone that gets up when he can’t.”

~ Jack Dempsey (Legendary Boxing Champion)

The key to personal and professional improvement is accountability. My mentoring and coaching program has availability. Contact me at dan@danweedin.com or (360) 271-1592 to apply.

Extra Points: Readiness & Preparedness

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40I’d be remiss on the last Monday of National Preparedness Month if I didn’t spend a little time providing my own public service announcement on readiness and preparedness. While not the most glamorous topic in the world, it becomes very important when it becomes important.

We spend every day managing risk yet, never really think about it. Many people drive to work and take routes based on time and safety concerns. Your GPS is a risk management tool diverting you from traffic problems that could cause the “peril” of you being late to an important meeting. We wear seat belts for two risk management factors – physical safety if involved in an accident and monetary loss for paying a ticket for non-compliance. We even make preparedness decisions in the type of vehicles we purchase for comfort (avoiding the peril of discomfort), style (reputation and brand), and fuel consumption (money).

Unfortunately, complacency sets in and leads to perilous behaviors. We’ve become so good at the skill of driving a car that we get caught in the trap of distraction. Some people believe they can drive while texting; while eating; while holding a phone to their ear; while putting on makeup; while speeding; and while a dog sits on their lap. Distracted driving has become more hazardous than driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Yet it’s become hard for our generation of people of all ages to eliminate this hazard.

We often run our companies the same way. After years of producing the same product or services, we can become complacent as an organization. The perils here all fall under a form of risk management because they endanger growth, operations, and profitability. Complacency within an organization regularly result in increased employee injuries, higher employee turnover, a reduction in sales, poor decision-making, and loss of reputation and brand value. Ultimately, the risk to avoid here is owning or being a part of a company that is in decline and losing value.

Since my Monday missives are meant to be more inspirational, allow me to end on such a note. The good news is we each have control of our own destiny. We can choose to take steps to better readiness and preparedness in our families and businesses. There is plenty of great information at our fingertips on how to best protect our homes, families, finances, and businesses from all sorts of calamities.

Here’s some light homework for your week. As you prepare to embark on the final quarter of 2018, invest some time in looking at your personal and professional readiness and preparedness. What positive steps can you take to assure your family’s well being in the vent of a crisis? How can you be best prepared to be a role model and leader? And how can you safeguard your employees and their families through proper risk management? Write to me and tell me what you did.

For those of you in business, I encourage you to check out my LinkedIn Learning series listed below on this newsletter. It’s free for LinkedIn Premium members. It will give you a full course on protecting your business. As individuals, go check out Ready.gov for information on preparing your family for life’s little accidents. You’ll be glad you did.

Be safe and ready out there…

Quote of the Week:

“You can find peace amidst the storms that threaten you.”

~ Joseph B. Wirthlin (20th century American businessman)

The key to personal and professional improvement is accountability. My mentoring and coaching program has availability. Contact me at dan@danweedin.com or (360) 271-1592 to apply.

Extra Points: Seven Deadly Words

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40We have always done it that way. 

Those seven words are deadly to an organization. Yet that thinking and behavior is common in companies of all sizes. Why?

Humans fear change. You may hear people – including yourself – say that they don’t like change; or that it’s hard to change. Both are cover-ups for the reality that change is scary and people are unwilling to change because they fear rejection, failure, or loss of reputation.

The truth about the age we live in is that change is more rapid and volatile than ever before in human history, and (this is important) we will continue to say that every year because of the development end evolving of technology in our lives. Those industries that aren’t willing to innovate and create; to change thinking, activities, and behaviors, are bound to be flattened by the changing tide.

I toured my client’s brand-new building that features a coworking facility. During the tour, she mentioned that facilities like hers were once only found in metropolitan areas, but now were becoming more in vogue all over. She said that this unique way of creating workspace was becoming the future of “work.” This isn’t a tend, but a movement to make work more enjoyable, easier, and more profitable for individuals and organizations. I concur with her assessment. Those companies that don’t embrace concepts like these to attract or keep great employees will ultimately lose them to ones that are willing to change how they view “work.”

What about you and your business? What changes have you not considered? What is the future of your industry or career? What concept is just waiting for you to try and succeed?

Change is necessary for growth and development in business. Heck, I’ll argue that it’s necessary for survival. If you want to avoid going the way of the video store, make sure you’re prepared to be nimble, innovative and change-centric and exchange those seven deadly words with five better ones…

That is a good idea.

Quote of the Week:

”The secret of business is to know something that nobody else knows.”

~ Aristotle Onassis

© 2018 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The key to personal and professional improvement is accountability. My mentoring and coaching program has availability. Contact me at dan@danweedin.com or (360) 271-1592 to apply.