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Extra Points: The Power of Persuasion

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40This Week’s Focus Point: The Power of Persuasion

When I was in New York City in March, I had the great pleasure of dining with friends at historic Keen’s Steakhouse. The Manhattan restaurant was founded in 1885 and is famous for its steaks, chops, and collection of 90,000 clay pipes that line the walls and ceilings.

I was there during Lent and it was a Friday, which meant no steak for me. Fortunately, their fish selections were fantastic. The menu featured their acclaimed Dover sole. I was also intrigued by the chard because while familiar with the Atlantic fish, I’d never tried it. When I asked the waiter for his suggestion between the two, he of course said they were both grand, yet he had a twinkle in his eye and a heightened hint of enthusiasm when he spoke of the chard (which was decidedly less expensive than the sole). It intrigued me enough to get it, and boy was I glad I did! It was one of the best fish dishes I’ve ever had, if not the top. The power of the waiter’s suggestion persuaded me to a great dining experience.

The waiter gave me his honest opinion in spite of a lower bill (meaning the possibility of a lower gratuity). His candor was in my best interest and translated into a memorable experience. His focus was on the value of that experience.

In your business, sales are mandatory for survival. Are you (or your sales team) persuading people with enthusiasm based for the value your customer or client will receive, or based on money in their pocket? Sales people focused on earning a commission rather than the client’s best interest ultimately get found out. The problem is they bring your company’s reputation and future sales down with them. You can do a lot for the growth and sustainability of your business by building a culture of outcome-based sales. In other words, believing in the tremendous value to others and transferring that benefit in exchange for equitable compensation. In the end, it’s a win-win-win situation.

In my story, I won (magnificent experience) , the waiter won (equitable compensation), and the restaurant won (reputation and brand). I can’t wait to go back.

Are your clients saying the same thing about you?

Quote of the Week:


“In order to attain the impossible, one must attempt the absurd.”

~ Miguel de Cervantes (16th century Spanish novelist)

© 2016 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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