Got Work?

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40Captain Jack loves to work.

No really. I mean loves to work. He knows when I’m done eating breakfast and begin to stand up, that it’s time to work (even though often it’s not – I might just need a second cup of coffee!). He makes a beeline for my office door, which is a straight-shot down the hall. He literally hurls himself at the closed door with both front paws outstretched as if somehow he will knock it to the ground. He just might someday. At this point, he starts jumping up and down while emitting an exuberant bark, which would make you think there was a room full of beef jerky with his name on it inside the room.

Now Jack thinks he works. His main role (of which he is performing magnificently at as I write this) is to sleep in his chair. Yes, his own chair in my office. My wife Barb doesn’t even have her own chair, primarily because she’s not shown the same enthusiasm for “work” in my office. Even though it may seem redundant, Jack is most happy at work.

Are you happy at “work?”

My theory is that a great majority of people work for a paycheck. They don’t really love their job; have a passion for it; see themselves as a tremendous value; and can’t wait to “retire” someday so they can quit working. The most successful people – not just professionally – are the ones that do what they love every day. Their passion for their work magically transforms into fun. They value themselves and their contribution and most often are compensated equitably for that value. Why are you “working” where you are now? You either loved it and one point and now want a divorce; or you settled becasue it was a job. Regardless, it’s never too late to rekindle or discover that fire. Life’s too short.

I try to take Captain Jack’s approach every day. I don’t really “work.” I do what I love and have fun every day, and get paid for it by people who value my expertise. I don’t see a need to retire because I’m having fun. So is Captain Jack. Are you?

Quote of the Week:

“Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long shot.”

~ Charlie Chaplin

© 2016 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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