Home > Extra Points, Uncategorized > Extra Points: The Burden of Reactive Chaos

Extra Points: The Burden of Reactive Chaos

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40Dogs aren’t normally proactive. Captain Jack and Bella are constantly reacting to sights, sounds, and opportunities happening around them. For example, Captain Jack hates the sound of electronic noises emanating from phones (even if they are on TV). His immediate reaction is obnoxious barking, pathetic whining, and a seek and destroy mentality on the object producing the noise. Dogs have no great concern for their future (at least mine don’t), so reacting is simply a part of their instinct.

Many of us humans choose that same instinct. We use terms like: putting out fires; running around like a chicken with their head cut off; and constantly running. The consequences are working late hours, reducing time with family and friends, lack of productivity, and health problems. I’ve witnessed people defend this behavior as a badge of honor, implying that they perform best under crisis.

That’s just dumb.

There is a very real burden of being in constant reactive chaos. It’s mentally and physically fatiguing; it leads to bad decision-making; and it creates anxiety for employees, co-workers, and family members. I believe if given the choice of being in constant crisis reaction mode versus cool and calm, most people will choose the latter.

Here’s what you can resolve to do this new year to reduce your reactive chaos: Identify areas of recurring and constant chaos or adversity. Find ways to eliminate them, rather than constantly putting bandages on them. Take necessary (and often unpleasant) steps to implement your strategy. Be nimble. Set priorities. Stop trying to please everyone. Get outside help. Be resilient. Enjoy the moment.

Note that crisis will occur when least expected and you’ll need to deal with those unexpected setbacks and adversity. However, if you’ve drastically reduced the amount of chaos through proactive behavior, you’ll ultimately be more resilient and happier.

If you’d like to discuss how I can help you and your company reduce your own reactive chaos and unleash your potential, then please call me at (360) 271-1592 or email me. We can all use help in stopping chasing our tails!

Quote of the Week:

“Errors are the consequence of a complicated life.”

~ Alan Weiss

© 2016 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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