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Posts Tagged ‘disaster recovery’

Extra Points: Practice & Build Out Your Plans

September 18, 2017 Leave a comment

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40This is Part 3 of a four-part series this month in honor of National Preparedness Month. While this may not seem to be the sexiest of topics, you need look no further than the wreckage left by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma to understand the life and death issues faced by you, your family, and your business.

Week 3 focuses on creating and practicing your plans. This reminds of being a high school basketball coach. Each week, the coaching staff would put together a plan for the two teams we would play that week. We would then focus our practice and preparation on that plan, including very specific situations that would simulate the games. Creating a plan to survive – both in your personal life and for your business – demands the same process.

Step 1 is to actually think about, write, down, and communicate a plan. This step is for both your home and business. You should include things like first aid kit locations, emergency funds access, critical document storage, evacuation planning, and how everyone will communicate. Very few small and medium-sized businesses ever get past Step 1!
If you are a business owner, you have a responsibility to your employees and their families. If you have a family, you have a responsibility to them. Not doing so is negligent and dangerous.

Step 2 is knowing how to access community resources. This means shelters, food banks, and other resources that your local, county, and state emergency management teams have created. I know in my city, City Hall is designated as a community shelter in an emergency. They will provide heat, shelter, and food for those that have had some impact and are vulnerable. Do you know where your emergency shelters are in your city or town?

Step 3 is practicing your plan. I often tell business clients that while the fire extinguishers mounted on the walls in their business are nice, they are useless if nobody knows how to use them. You can have an evacuation plan that fails miserably if nobody knows it; a communication plan that falls on deaf ears if it hasn’t been tested; and someone become injured or die because they never practiced how to stay alive and guessed wrong. Bottom line: practice your plan to assure the safety and well being of the most important people in your life.

There is a fabulous program meant to train people to be first responders and help each other. It’s called Until Help Arrives and information can be located here – Learn more.

Next and final week, we focus on getting involved and being part of something larger. Being “safe out there” is incumbent on planning ahead.

P.S. Follow me on Facebook. This month, I will be doing a Facebook Live segment on how to pack a “go bag” in case you must evacuate your home and one that you should keep at work in case you get stuck and can’t make it home for days. I’m also posting daily tips on Twitter.

Quote of the Week:

”To be wronged is nothing unless you continue to remember it.”

~ Confucius

© 2017 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Do you need help creating an emergency crisis plan for your business or family? Call me and let’s schedule a meeting to talk. The time to act is before you need it. Email me

Lessons from Hurricane Harvey

August 30, 2017 Leave a comment

He is ready to fight for success

Rainy Days Happen To Us All
The images of Houston and the surrounding areas hit by Hurricane Harvey are heartbreaking. The devastation will have an impact on residents and businesses for decades.

All of our hearts go out to the people suffering and trying to survive this tragedy.

However before the rest of us get too comfortable in our chairs, it’s the right time to take stock of our own precarious situations. Houston is the latest in a long line of calamities, and it won’t be the last. What can we learn and most importantly implement from Hurricane Harvey?

September is National Preparedness Month and a great time to assess your current state of readiness and preparedness. How resilient are you personally and professionally?

I’m offering you risk assessment questionnaires for your current state of readiness and preparedness in your professional and personal lives. They’re short, simple, and free.

There are two forms: one for business and one for personal. After completing one or both, you can send them to me via email and I will respond within 24 hours with a brief assessment and some suggestions. If after, you’d like to schedule a chat about your situation, we can do that.

We see occurrences like what is happening in the Houston area and are shocked and saddened; however all too often we forget about them quickly and go on without making any changes that will better us. Don’t let that happen this time. Take a few minutes to understand how ready and prepared your business and family are so that when you face your own calamity, you are in a position of strength and resilience.

LINK for Business Assessment

LINK  for Personal Assessment

© 2017 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Core Strength

March 5, 2015 2 comments

I’ve started changing how I work out. The reason is quite simple…my core strength stinks.Dan Weedin Unleashed-19

You see, I’ve been working out since being a high school athlete. For the most part, I’ve focused on the “fun” exercises; the ones that show the quickest results and you get to most enjoyment performing. For me, that was upper body work and strength. When you’re young, it’s easier to get away with that because a lot of other things I used to do (e.g. play competitive basketball) kept me in overall good shape. As I’ve begun to “mature,” some of those fun things have either drastically changed or stopped entirely. The regrettable result is that my core strength is exposed because it has been neglected. To that end, I am now humbling myself to learn new “tricks” to do the work that I’ve never found fun…abs and legs. I am writing this today since this morning I was focused on those two areas. We will see how agile I am later this afternoon…

For your business to stay agile and resilient as it matures, you’d better have a good core strength. In your case, that’s a strategic plan to deal with anything that can hurt you. Allow me to explain…

I’ve watched people age well into their 80s and 90s. Not just my parents, but the people around them. I’ve observed how poor balance, decreased strength, and loss of perception wreaks havoc on their bodies and their ability to function. By being intentional and strategic about my exercise regimen, I’m giving myself the best chance of avoiding or at least mitigating that peril when I get to that age.

Your business will face crisis. In fact, it’s most likely that you will face many crises over the years, all different in size and scope. Those executives and business owners that don’t build up their core strength – their planning, preparation, and practice – are in a clear and present danger situation. In the event of a serious crisis, they are as likely as a 93 year old to lose their balance, stumble, fall, and not be able to get up. For both, the consequences can be catastrophic.

So here’s what you do…

Take a cue from my revised exercise plan. Create your own plan on building up your core by creating a comprehensive strategic crisis and disaster recovery plan; include a communications plan to apprise your employees, customers, supply chain, etc.; implement and practice regularly; get help from experts to assure you’re not breathing your own exhaust; and repeat annually. This way, you’re giving yourself the best chance to avoid the calamity of not being able to survive a “fall.”

Your health can’t be delegated to someone else. Crisis leadership can’t be delegated, either. If you’re the boss, it’s your job to strategize. You can delegate tasks, but not the global planning and strategy. And just like brushing off regular workouts, this is the biggest mistakes business leaders make in their company. It’s time to get real and get serious to protect your business and all those that count on you. And it only starts with a few situps…

© 2015 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

© 2015 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

Last Chance to Register for Important Workshop

September 4, 2014 Leave a comment

umbrella_riskEarthquake, fire, flood, loss of power, data breach, injured worker, auto accident, workplace violence, loss of key employee, reputation damage, economic downturn, hazardous spill, sued by employee, inability to operate, loss of property….

Crisis happens everyday to small businesses around the world and it can literally cripple you. Not being prepared and ready to meet that crisis and survive is negligent. Too many people are counting on you.

Join me and many of your peers for a very important workshop on creating a disaster plan for your business. Your investment is one hour of your time and $50. It’s recorded so you don’t even have to be there live. You watch it later and it becomes a permanent part of your risk management library.

Today at 12 pm PST / 3 pm EST. It may just be the most important workshop you attend because it might just save your business.

Link to register

© 2014 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

New Webinar ~ Staying Alive: Disaster Recovery Made Simple for Small Business

August 5, 2014 Leave a comment

umbrella_riskThis one-hour webinar workshop is specifically tailored for small business owners (1 to 100 employees). I constantly hear that there is simply not enough time or budget to spend on crisis strategy and disaster recovery planning.

Okay…now I’ve got your solution!

By attending this live and interactive workshop, you will walk away with your very own disaster recovery game plan for your business. I will walk you step by step through the process, so you will have an actionable plan ready to implement. You will be able to ask questions along the way AND have email access to me for up to 72 hours after the workshop.

September is National Preparedness Month, so it’s an ideal time to get your plan in place. For the investment of one hour and $50, your return will be potentially massive. Don’t leave the viability of your business and the well being of your employees to chance. Being unprepared is negligent. Conquer crisis in your business and safeguard all you’ve worked for.

Register now by clicking on this link~ space is limited.

Note ~ Don’t sit on this information if you’re not a small business owner. Pass this on to your boss, your friends, your clients, your peers, and your colleagues that are. This workshop may just save their business and you will be a hero!

Click here to register

P.S. The workshop will be recorded and sent to all registrants, so they can keep it forever. Also works in case they can’t be there live.

 

© 2014 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

Wht Do You Need a Crisis Plan?

February 20, 2014 Leave a comment

umbrella_riskIt never ceases to amaze me when executives and business owners delay or simply refuse to put a strategic crisis plan in place for their business. I see it over and over again with small businesses. Quite honestly, it’s negligent on their part. They risk their profit, their revenue, their employee’s future, their reputation, and the impact to their supply chain. Other than that, it’s not a big deal.

Later today, I am hosting a webinar for executives in the assisted living and elder care community on the topic. These are some quick bullet points on the reasons to invest time and resources towards a plan. If you are in a position where you’re ultimately responsible for the sustainability and resiliency of an organization, you should all me. Or, allow me to put it this way – If you want to assure that no crisis is fatal to your business, you should call me. You will get a plan that meets these objectives:

  • To maximize the prevention of crisis or disaster situations from ever occurring.
  • To minimize the likelihood of any suspension of operations.
  • To minimize interruptions to the normal operations.
  • To limit the extent of disruption and damage.
  • To minimize the economic impact of the interruption.
  • To establish alternative means of operation in advance.
  • To train personnel with emergency procedures.
  • To provide for smooth and rapid restoration of service.
  • To assure that no crisis is fatal to the organization.
  • To set up a communication procedure for employees, supply chain, media, and community.
© 2014 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

Weather Woes

February 13, 2014 2 comments

Atlanta snowCrisis management is an executive function and should never be relegated down the chain of command. A good case study is what is happening on the East Coast today.

In case you missed it, the Eastern seaboard is getting pummeled by snow. New York City is expecting up to 15 inches. The storm is affecting states along the coast all the way down to Atlanta. I watched the pictures on CNN this morning on my treadmill walk. What resonated with me is the amount of chaos happening with transportation. Many roads are simply inaccessible. People are abandoning their cars and walking. Airlines all over the country are being affected.

CEOs of a companies based out of the East Coast that haven’t made contingency plans for this, are simply negligent. Everyone who lives over there knows from empirical evidence through the years that these storms occur and what the impact is. Plans to combat these storms and mitigate damage to ongoing operations, employee safety, communications, and potential structural damage should have already been written, practiced, and  repeated frequently over the course of the year that isn’t affected. If transportation is critical to the business, what plans are in place to deal with that?

CEOs that delegate this strategic thinking get caught in the storm. The implementation and manifestation of the plan is always done by others. However, the strategy, communication, and accountability rests with the boss.

If you’re not in the midst of the latest weather debacle back East. consider yourself fortunate. Also consider acting on your OWN crisis strategy plan because you might be next. We are offered these lessons all the time. The really savvy CEOs and Presidents act on them. The ones that don’t end up blaming someone else for inefficiency. My suggestion is that you be the former and conquer crisis before it conquers you.

P.S. To all my friends, colleagues, and clients back on the East Coast…be safe, stay warm and dry, and best wishes to a quick return to “normalcy!”

© 2014 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved