Archive

Posts Tagged ‘golf’

Extra Points: Who’s Your Caddie?

July 24, 2017 Leave a comment

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40I just finished watching an incredible and dramatic ending to The Open Championship (aka The British Open). Jordan Spieth displayed an unbelievable amount of poise, focus, and patience in winning the championship when the momentum and tide had turned sharply against him late in the round. I understand there may be many readers that are not golf fans, and this isn’t going to be regurgitation of the tournament. What you do need to know is that in 40 years of watching professional golf, I’ve never seen anything like it.

During his victory speech, Spieth thanked his caddie, Michael Greller. This isn’t unusual, yet Spieth said something which captured my attention. He said that Greller helped him keep his head in the game when things were going poorly. He acknowledged that he was getting down on himself “as any person would,” and that Greller kept him on a positive mindset and focused on the next swing. He said the trophy was as much Greller’s as it was his.

Caddies are critical to pro golfers for much more than simply handing them the next club and carrying the bag. They end up being a combination of psychologist, accountability partner, sounding board, and coach. Who’s your caddie?

Every business professional will face trials and tribulations in their career. Just like a round of golf on the biggest stage, those that are resilient and focused on positive outcomes win the day, even if they don’t win the championship. As Spieth accurately noted, “any person” can and will get down on themselves. We all need a caddie to help us.

While some of you may say that your spouse or significant other act as your caddie, I’d offer you this perspective: There are no professional golfers using their spouses or significant other to tote the bag for them. You find spouses and significant others giving support from behind the ropes, but in those crucial moments, there is a need for an objective voice and often a tough love that can’t be duplicated by those closest to us.

If you truly want to be successful in your career, you need to find a caddie that will talk you back into focus when you need it, hold you accountable to your goals, and provide both tough love and an encouraging pat on the back when needed. You’ll find that they will ultimately save you many “strokes” in your championship round!

Quote of the Week:

”Concentration comes out of a combination of confidence and hunger.”

~ Arnold Palmer

© 2017 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Do you need a caddie? Call me and let’s schedule a meeting to talk. I’m confident I can help you and your business unleash your potential and profits.

Extra Points: Full Swing Thinking

December 12, 2016 Leave a comment

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40I had a great idea a couple of weeks ago. At least, I think it was a great idea.

My garage is very tall because we have a full daylight basement. It’s easily 20 feet straight up and wide enough for two cars. One day when I was in there, I spotted a couple of golf driving range mats I’d purchased for next to nothing from the range when they were going to discard them. I observed my surroundings and came to the conclusion that my garage made a perfect private driving range for me to practice during the winter.

I plopped down a mat about a dozen yards away from the closed garage door and grabbed an 8-iron out of my bag. I took one of my practice balls that is made out of rubber and dropped it on the mat. I took a couple practice swings to feel comfortable. I eyed my target on the heavy wooden door. And then I boldly took a full swing and connected solidly with that 8-iron. You know what happened next…

When rubber traveling at a high rate of speed impacts a very heavy wooden door, the result is the ball shooting straight back to me like a cannon ball being shot out of a cannon. As agile as Russell Wilson evading a defender, I dove out of the way of the ball coming straight for my head. I determined a net would be in order for future use of my new innovation.

Funny thing. Had I been out on the golf course with the same 8-iron and real golf ball staring at my next shot, I might have been (based on experience) distracted and potentially “fearful” of the sand traps guarding the green; the out of bounds stakes to my right; and the water hazard directly behind my target. All those factors might clog my brain, lessen my confidence, and alter my swing. Ironically, faced with the potential of getting struck in the face with a rubber ball traveling 1,000 mph (you had to be there), I was fearless.

We often let real life hazards distract us. Those hazards you face when making hard decisions; when assessing results vs. consequences; and when determining your own path (see last week), will clog your brain, lessen your confidence, and mess up your swing.

Don’t be scared of onrushing calamity because you can avoid it. Be scared of choosing the path of least resistance; be scared of wasting valuable time; be scared of not living your life to the fullest; and be scared of not living outside the fence that you built around yourself.

Take a full swing with boldness and confidence. You may just hit the green.

Quote of the Week:

“I’m not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion.”

~ Alexander the Great

© 2016 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

No Rest for the Stupid

October 6, 2016 2 comments

Dan Weedin Unleashed-19Yesterday afternoon, my daughter Mindy and I went out to hit golf balls at the local driving range. I purchased a large bucket instead of my normal medium or small size because I’m getting ready to play in a tournament on Saturday, and figured I could use the extra swings.

While the concept was okay, the results were stupid.

The reason for the stupidity was centered not so much on strategy, but on tactics. Instead of keeping with my normal practice pattern, I found myself “raking and ripping.”This is a common malady for golfers on a driving range. It’s the act of “raking” a golf ball from it’s little waiting trough to the mat, and then “ripping” at it. The increased number of balls over time actually wore me out. It’s not how you play golf. You don’t just stand in one spot hitting ball after ball with no break; rather you hit a ball, walk to the next one, hit a different club, and rinse and repeat. I basically hit more balls in rapid fire mode, than I would over four hours on the course.

The results by the end of the session were terrible. I lost all accuracy, got mad (which exacerbated the situation), and left for home frustrated at my results. While I enjoyed my time together with Mindy, that would have even been improved with a better experience.

What would NOT have been stupid was slowing the process down, being patient, having goals, and resting when I needed it. The results and experience would have been better and I’d have had more fun.

This analogy also fits a business problem.

Business leaders often spend too much time “raking and ripping” in their business an career. Here are a few examples:

  • Not having clear goals and metrics before implementing initiatives and projects
  • Veering from strategies and tactics that worked in an effort to falsely accelerate results
  • Becoming impatient with bad results and not taking the time and effort to find the root cause of those results
  • Being stubborn rather than nimble
  • Seeking perfection rather than success
  • Allowing poor performance in business to encroach in personal relationships
  • Working one’s self to exhaustion, rather than taking time to rest and rejuvenate

It took me until this morning to realize that my mechanics aren’t bad, rather my process was …, well, stupid. At the very least, I needed time to rest. Just like in weight training, your muscles need time in between sets (and days) to rest; I needed to rest at proper intervals; you need to find time to rest your brain and spirit. Otherwise, you end up frustrated and that transfers to everyone in your circle of life.

So don’t be stupid like I was. Take time to plan, strategize, learn, and have patience. And by all means, carve out time to rest and re-charge so you’ll always be on your A game!

© 2016 Toro Consulting, Inc. All rights reserved

Extra Points: Branding Your Path to Success

October 3, 2016 Leave a comment

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40Arnold Palmer died at the age of 87 just over a week ago. His passing not only impacted the golf and sports world, but the business community, too. Arnie was not only a legend in golf; he was an iconic business leader and entrepreneur.

The most Arnold Palmer ever won for any one golf tournament was $50,000, yet he was worth in excess of $650M at his death. During his playing days, Arnie created a true persona of the “every man;” bringing golf out of the country club and engaging everyone. His charisma, style, and genuine love of people spawned “Arnie’s Army,” followed by gobs of endorsements. He actually paved the way for all athletes to earn income outside of their playing contracts through endorsements. He also was highly astute in business, forming corporations, starting The Golf Channel and Champions Tour, and countless other endeavors. He understood that you are your own brand. That who you are, how you treat others, and being authentically unique would lead to archetypal business success. Heck, he even has his own beverage named after him!

What about you and your business or career?

How would others define you? Are you recognizable? Does the value you provide resonate because of your skills, knowledge, and charisma?

While you may face competition in industry, no one can be you. You’re uniquely brand-able, and you’d better understand the power of it. Without maximizing your unique value to others, you’ll be emblematically leaving putts short for birdie much too often. However, if you unleash your brand through strategic marketing, planning, and delivery, then you’ll be hitting greens and sinking birdie putts on the way to becoming legendary.

Quote of the Week:

The road to success is always under construction.

~ Arnold Palmer

shrimptanklogoNext Seattle Shrimp Tank podcast is October 4th at 4 pm PST. Our guest will be Rusty George of Rusty George Creative. Catch the recorded podcast from September 27th and our gust Matthew “Griff” Griffin from Combat Flip Flops. WEBSITE

© 2016 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

A Tribute to Arnold Palmer

September 26, 2016 Leave a comment

thIf only we had cell phone cameras in 1987…

The GTE Northwest Classic was being played at Inglewood Country Club outside of Seattle. The GTE was the senior tour where all the legends of golf (over 50 years old) played. My brother-in-law worked for GTE at the time and got me passage into the tournament to watch. I followed Arnold Palmer for 18 holes.

I started playing golf at 13 years old in 1978. Jack Nicklaus and Seve Ballesteros were my first golf heroes. Mr. Palmer by that time was nearing 50 years old and wasn’t a regular on the PGA Tour anymore. However, if you golfed, you knew Arnold Palmer and I was no different.

So when I had a chance to watch The King in person, I devoted the entire round to him. I followed tee to green for all 18 holes, stopping at every shot behind him to eagerly watch him in action. Had I only had my iPhone, you’d have seen a few selfies!

My favorite story of him came midway through that round. Mr. Palmer had hooked a ball a little to the left and found himself stymied by a tree. He stood behind the ball and pensively considered his options. The crowd was hushed in anticipation. Then suddenly breaking the silence, a woman exclaimed, “But Arnie, I’ve seen you hit these in your videos all the time…” The crowd nervously chuckled. Mr. Palmer turned around, made eye contact with the woman, then reached out his club to her and replied, “Okay then. Here, you hit it for me!” He smiled and the crowd erupted. He then on cue hit a beautiful shot right at the green.

Arnold Palmer – like Muhammad Ali who passed earlier this year – transcended his own sport. His dedication to fans, to the game, and to people was an unmistakable hallmark of the man. He touched everybody in the game in some way; and his list of accomplishments and awards outside of golf is impressive, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Medal of Honor. I even noted in reading his biography today that he’s a Rotary Paul Harris Fellow, which adds a common bond with me.

Arnold Palmer was a brilliant businessman, basing his entrepreneurship and philanthropy on helping improve the lives of people. He will be sorely missed, however it’s clear his legacy will continue and help others though what he’s made sure to leave behind. The game of golf, the business and philanthropic community, and the world will miss him.

I’m thinking a toast in his honor, lifting a cold Arnold Palmer, is in order…

© 2016 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

 

Perilous For Your Business Health

June 22, 2016 Leave a comment

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40I read this morning that professional golf superstar Rory McIlroy is skipping the upcoming Olympic games in Rio due to concerns about the Zika virus. I recently saw him interviewed and he stated how he was very eager and excited about representing his native Ireland as an Olympian. Golf hasn’t been an event in the Olympics since Theodore Roosevelt was President of the United States, and there’s no guarantee it will make the next one. Obviously, the growing concern over the virus has swayed this 27 year old who is getting married within the year to look beyond golf and glory. His legacy as a father and health of his family took precedence. He’s not the only one…

Athletes want to compete in the Olympic Games. For many, it’s the crowning achievement of their craft and because it only comes around every four years, the window of opportunity is small. What the Olympic Committee has basically created is a terrible situation where you have demand, you have ample supply, but that supply is tainted and toxic.

Consider those in the business of selling products and services to individuals and business…most likely you are one of them. Do you have a demand and supply, but make the process of buying toxic?

Certainly you aren’t dealing with a health hazard like mosquitoes and polluted water. However, your client experience may be such that they will avoid you like the Zika virus! Here are three quick ways to avoid being spurned:

  1. Make access to you easy. Look at your web site, social media platforms, email signatures, and digital or hard copy brochures. I’m amazed at how difficult it is to find contact information for some businesses. It should be easier than ever! And once they can find you, make the call a pleasant experience, not akin to having a tooth pulled.
  2. Be solutions driven. Problems happen from time to time. It’s one of the costs of doing business. Instead of fearing or dreading dealing withe them, employ people that seek the opportunity to solve problems quickly, fearlessly, and with authority. That last one is vitally important. The overwhelming majority of your clients and prospects understand that challenges and adversity occur; they simply want someone that can rapidly and professionally solve them.
  3. Be consistent. My experience is that consistency, even in less than perfect situations, keeps clients and customers coming back. Inconsistent policies, procedures, responses to questions, access, and products/services alienate those that want and need your help and product.

Here’s the deal…I know you’re not harmful to the health of your client, but you very well may be harmful to your business by not being cognizant of the factors that contribute to client and prospect dissatisfaction. Work to be exceptional on my three solutions I listed, and you won’t have to worry about anyone bowing out of your “event.”

 

© 2016 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

 

 

Be Good To Yourself

May 20, 2016 Leave a comment

20 Under 40 20_3Jordan Spieth was arguably the best golfer in the world in 2015. He won two major championships – the Masters and United States Open – and culminated the year with the FedEx Championship. All the golf pundits were not taking a giant leap of faith when proclaiming he was going to have another terrific year in 2016.

Spite has gotten off to a very slow, and in some cases, a rocky start. He’s been uncharacteristically poor in his shots and noticeably more agitated on the golf course. Now let’s be fair; Spieth is only 22 years old and has had a ton of early success. People have been amazed at his poise and savvy at such a young age. Regardless, it’s been a surprising start to the new year.

Last week, Spieth finally admitted in a press conference that he was being too hard on himself on the course. His self-talk was bad; he was intolerant of his own mistakes; and he found himself trying too hard to make up for poor shots. Basically, Spieth has fallen victim to what many of us do more regularly. That is not being good to yourself.

Many entrepreneurs and business owners left one boss to start their own business, and ended up working for a tyrant. Themselves. Is that you? Just like Jordan Spieth is susceptible to being too hard on himself on the golf course, business owners can do the same thing. For that matter, business professionals and all people can do the same thing. We are willing to cut somebody else some slack, but incapable of doing to ourselves. Sound familiar?

I’m pretty sure Spieth will adjust. His track record already indicates that. What about you? Are you willing to improve your self-talk and cut yourself slack when you aren’t perfect, make mistakes, and fail? In order to maximize your talent and unleash your potential, you must. In order to take your business or company to greater heights, you need to have positive self-talk and be able to forgive yourself for failures and try again.

Are you willing to be good to yourself?

© 2016 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved