Extra Points: Receiver-Based Engagement

Dan_Weedin_022Client engagement is critical to thriving in business. While that’s as obvious as a ham sandwich, what isn’t so obvious is how a company engages. There are two options – transmitter-based and recipient-based. Guess which one is best?

When companies make it difficult for clients to engage with them out of fear, apathy, or laziness, they engage in transmitter-based engagement. In the 21st century, that’s deadly for business. Examples: A caller to a small business is forced to choose between seven different options to find a human (and none of the seven is what they want and when they push one, they still get no human); a website visitor can’t easily find a way to contact a human directly; a voice mail tells a client that they will receive a call back “as soon as possible,” instead of offering a time limit or alternate quicker options.

Receiver-based engagement puts the client or prospective client first. Examples: They make social media engagement easy and fast; they make phone call engagement easy and fast; they anticipate the easiest routes to communication – things like online chat. Bottom line, the current and certainly future clients in your business expect receiver-based engagement or else they will seek it elsewhere.

My colleague David Mortimore has created a fascinating case study based off the recent challenges faced by Johnson & Johnson. While J&J may be a corporate mammoth, the concept applies even more to small and medium-sized businesses. David has kindly offered this case study for your review. Ask for it below and you will be emailed the case study..

Bottom line: If you want to build a brand, to acquire new clients, to grow, and to thrive, then creating or enhancing a receiver-based engagement should be job #1 for 2019. Check out David’s case study and get started today!

Quote of the Day:

“Failure is a success, if we learn from it.”

~ Malcolm Forbes

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