Memorial Day Special

Normandy
Normandy

This week’s memo is a reprint from last year’s Memorial Day Special. Best wishes to you and your loved ones on this holiday Monday…

In memorium. In memory of. Remembrance.
All words that signify and define the word, “memorial.”
I can’t imaging what it would have felt like on June 6, 1944. To be 21 years old, standing on a Navy ship, and set to be on a landing party to the beaches in Normandy. The odds said that you’d be a casualty and you knew it.
The chill of the wind and the rain in the Atlantic just off the shore of France, and far away from wherever you hailed from.
By the time the fighting was over, there would be 4,414 confirmed dead, and over 10,000 casualties. That scene I describe can certainly be played out over centuries. Men and women facing certain death, yet risking all for all for country.
My dad spent 30 years in the Navy and served in World War II. He wasn’t at Normandy, but was at the North African Invasion and certainly survived the war. He was always quick to point out that Memorial Day was not the day to honor those that served, but those that died. Those that gave the greatest sacrifice. Veterans Day is the day to honor all who served and serve. Memorial Day is the day to honor the fallen. I’ve never forgotten that.
Memorial Day was borne out of the Civil War and a desire to honor the dead. During the first national celebration on May 30, 1868, former Union General and sitting Ohio Congressman (and future President of the United States) James Garfield made a speech where 20,000 graves were “decorated” for both Union and Confederate soldiers.
Today we honor all those that have fallen in wars, conflicts, and service from the Revolutionary War to the present. Let’s all remember this as we take a holiday break from our labors to recall those that gave the ultimate sacrifice so we can.
In memorium. In memory of. Remembrance.
Quote of the Day:
“Courage is feat holding on a minute longer.”
~ General George Patton
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Extra Points: Memorial Day Special

Normandy
Normandy

This Week’s Focus Point: Memorial Day Special

This week’s memo is a reprint from last year’s Memorial Day Special…

In memorium. In memory of. Remembrance.

All words that signify and define the word, “memorial.”

I can’t imaging what it would have felt like on June 6, 1944. To be 21 years old, standing on a Navy ship, and set to be on a landing party to the beaches in Normandy. The odds said that you’d be a casualty and you knew it. The chill of the wind and the rain in the Atlantic just off the shore of France, and far away from wherever you hailed from.

By the time the fighting was over, there would be 4,414 confirmed dead, and over 10,000 casualties. That scene I describe can certainly be played out over centuries. Men and women facing certain death, yet risking all for all for country.

My dad spent 30 years in the Navy and fought in World War II. He wasn’t at Normandy, but was at the North African Invasion and certainly survived the war. He was always quick to point out that Memorial Day was not the day to honor those that served, but those that died. Those that gave the greatest sacrifice. Veterans Day is the day to honor all, Memorial Day was the day to honor the fallen. I’ve never forgotten that.

Memorial Day was borne out of the Civil War and a desire to honor the dead. During the first national celebration on May 30, 1868, former Union General and sitting Ohio Congressman (and future President of the United States) James Garfield made a speech where 20,000 graves were “decorated” for both Union and Confederate soldiers. Today we honor all those that have fallen in wars, conflicts, and service from the Revolutionary War to the present. Let’s all remember this as we take a holiday break from our labors to recall those that gave the ultimate sacrifice so we can.

In memorium. In memory of. Remembrance.

Quote of the Week:

”In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.”

~ Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

© 2017 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Extra Points: Memorial Day Special

Dan Weedin Unleashed-40This Week’s Focus Point: Memorial Day Special

In memorium. In memory of. Remembrance.

All words that signify and define the word, “memorial.”

I can’t imaging what it would have felt like on June 6, 1944. To be 21 years old, standing on a Navy ship, and set to be on a landing party to the beaches in Normandy. The odds said that you’d be a casualty and you knew it. The chill of the wind and the rain in the Atlantic just off the shore of France, and far away from wherever you hailed from.

By the time the fighting was over, there would be 4,414 confirmed dead, and over 10,000 casualties. That scene I describe can certainly be played out over centuries. Men and women facing certain death, yet risking all for all for country.

My dad spent 30 years in the Navy and fought in World War II. He wasn’t at Normandy, but was at the North African Invasion and certainly survived the war. He was always quick to point out that Memorial Day was not the day to honor those that served, but those that died. Those that gave the greatest sacrifice. Veterans Day is the day to honor all, Memorial Day was the day to honor the fallen. I’ve never forgotten that.

Memorial Day was borne out of the Civil War and a desire to honor the dead. President James Garfield presided over the first “decoration day” at Arlington National Cemetery in 1868 where 20,000 graves were “decorated” for both Union and Confederate soldiers. Today we honor all those that have fallen in wars, conflicts, and service from the Revolutionary War to the present. Let’s all remember this as we take a holiday break from our labors to recall those that gave the ultimate sacrifice so we can.

In memorium. In memory of. Remembrance.

Quote of the Week:

“In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.”

~ Martin Luther King, Jr.
© 2016 Toro Consulting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Extra Points – Memorial Day Special

This week’s focus point…Memorial Day Special

Normandy
Normandy

 

Reprinted from Memorial Day 2012 and 2013. Looks like a tradition in the making…            

When I was a kid, Memorial Day was a day off from school. It was a great holiday because it marked the beginning of summer, the nearing of the end of another school year, and baseball.

My dad was a World War II veteran, a 30-year Navy man, and we lived in a Navy town. However, Memorial Day was just another holiday.

Today, that’s all changed. Yes, I still do like the perks – my wife gets the day off to stay home; the food; and the return of the sun. But I also more deeply understand the meaning for today.

It’s a time to honor all of those who gave their lives in service to our country. Those who served any length of time. And, to those who also serve us in law enforcement and the fire service. Thank you…

© 2014 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

This week’s quote – 

“I only regret that I have one life to lose for my country.

~ Nathan Hale
Weedin Unleashed LIVE broadcast tomorrow at 9:30 AM Pacific – Click here to join

 

Extra Points – Memorial Day

When I was a kid, Memorial Day was a day off from school. It was a great holiday because it marked the beginning of summer, the nearing of the end of another school year, and baseball. My dad was a World War II veteran, a 30-year Navy man, and we lived in a Navy town. However, Memorial Day was just another holiday.

Today, that’s all changed. Yes, I still do like the perks – my wife gets the day off to stay home; the food; and the return of the sun. But I also more deeply understand the meaning for today. It’s a time to honor all of those who gave their lives in service to our country. Those who served any length of time. And, to those who also serve us in law enforcement and the fire service. Thank you…

Normandy

Deadliest 100 Days Right Around the Corner

Monday is Memorial Day. It is just a little more meaningful for me this year as my father passed away ad was a 30-year veteran of the United States Navy. Memorial Day is an important holiday for us to honor our heroes. It’s also a terrific day to enjoy family, friends, and food.

However, it does mark a very dangerous time.

The 100 days in between Memorial Day and Labor Day in September are the most deadly for drivers on our roads. These 100 days see the most accidents and resulting injuries and death. There are many good reasons why…

  • Increased drinking and driving
  • More traveling for vacations
  • Distractions of good weather
  • More young drivers on the road with school out of session
  • Increased road rage issues

The bottom line is this – whether you’re a business owner or parent, understand that your sense of defensive driving must be on high alert for the next 100 days. Be careful, be attentive, and by all means be smart!

© 2011 Dan Weedin. All Rights Reserved

Heroes

Dan and DadIt was February 11, 1942.  A young man packed his bags for a trip from his home in Bremerton, WA for the Naval Recruiting Station in Seattle.  He had just turned 17 years old the day before.  That was the minimum age required to sign up for the Navy.  He had that date circled on his calendar since the previous December 7th.  His mother, who along with his father would have to sign off on his decision because he was a minor, told him he would stay and celebrate his birthday at home before he left.  A different set of orders to be obeyed.

My father ended up quitting school his junior year to do what many other young men did.  Go defend their country by joining the military and going to war.  In Dad’s mind, this wouldn’t take long. We were the United States of America.  He would be home soon.  Youthful exuberance, but no lack of courage.

My grandmother was certain she would never see her two oldest sons return from the war.  She ended up being wrong.  Both my Uncle Max and Dad spent the remainder of the war serving the Navy and the country.  Ironically, the son she did lose was Dad’s younger brother who died from pneumonia while he was gone.

Dad served 30 years in the Navy.  The good news for me was that during part of that time, he was stationed in Bogota, Colombia where he met and married my mom.

This is what Memorial Day is all about.

Funny, that as a kid growing up in the 1970’s and early 80’s, the same type of reverence for the military wasn’t there.  I was on the back end of an unpopular war in Vietnam.  Even though I grew up in a Navy town, the thought of serving my country never intrigued me.  That was for other people.  Not for me, or people I hung out with.  Turns out many of my friends ended up with fine careers in the military and still serve today.

Dad grew up during the Depression and because of the 40-year age difference; we were almost two generations different.  My hair was long, my music loud, and my taste in clothes awful (on that he was right).  I really didn’t come to respect what he and his generation, as well as earlier generations, did.

This is what Memorial Day is all about.

For the past decade, Dad has been a detective.  Genealogy is a passion for him.  He has researched our family back hundreds of years.  In fact, between him and my brother, they found we actually were able to join an elite group called the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR).  My great-great-great-great-great Grandfather, James McClelland was in the Pennsylvania militia during the Revolutionary War.  Because of the direct line of grandfathers down, this made us eligible for the SAR.  Dad did all the hard work in researching and completing the rigorous application to join.  All I had to do was prove he was my father (which he provided me the documentation) and write a check.  As has been the case most of my life, Dad made it easy for me.  Seems to have run in the family dating back 230 years.

This is what Memorial Day is all about.

Dad’s grandfather John Finis Weedin was a Seattle police officer in the early part of the turn of the 20th century.  We often forget that law enforcement is just as dangerous a job.  Even though it doesn’t involve shipping out to foreign lands, it still means protecting American citizens and keeping our country safe.  My great-grandfather served many years on the police force until DATE when he was killed in a gun battle in Seattle.  He was honored by the city with a street name, Weedin Place NE, in North Seattle.  My oldest daughter Mindy did a report on him for school and we took a picture by the sign.  My wife has not allowed me to go back and “borrow” the sign.  She thinks it might end me up in the opposite end of the law that Great-Granddad.  Of course she’s right, but I really want it!

This is what Memorial Day is all about.

One final thought on someone who I’m not related to but still consider a hero.  As my year as Rotary president draws to a close, the guy replacing me got in under somewhat humorous circumstances.  We voted him in as President-Elect when he wasn’t even at the meeting!  Remember, this is Rotary, not the President of the United States.  Not many candidates dueling with each other to get in.

Turns out my pal Roger Ludwig, had already volunteered for the job.  He just couldn’t be there to be voted on because he was in Iraq.  Roger is a local physician who also is a pilot in the National Guard.  He was dispatched to Iraq for many months as part of the duty he signed up for.  He left his practice, his wife, his two children, and his Rotary Club to serve his nation.  Now what’s his reward?  A bunch of unruly Rotarians every Friday morning!

What Memorial Day is all about are brave men and women who volunteered to put themselves in harm’s way for a greater good.  Democracy, patriotism, and security of our people are among those reasons.  I never had the guts to do it.  The bravest thing I’ve probably done is coach high school girls basketball!  I’m awfully glad there have been others who have – James McClelland, John Finis Weedin, Roger Ludwig, and Dad.

Those are some of my heroes.  Undoubtedly, you have stories just like mine.  That’s what makes our country so great.  It’s that we have, and do, have people bravely step up and protect our freedom.  Now is the time for me to say “thank you.”

This is what Memorial Day is all about.

Dan

(c) 2009 Dan Weedin – All Rights Reserved